fruitroutesflyersummerfront1

You are invited to share ideas for individual, collaborative and institutional action towards a more sustainable life through space to imagine and reflect, walks, conversation and sharing food and drink grown & produced on campus.  If you want to contribute, share research or get involved in any way let us know. Detailed programme below (subject to additions so please check back)

Exploring what we can do differently drawing from key themes that underpin Fruit Routes. The Yurt, Barefoot Orchard (opposite Pilkington Library, West Campus)

WEDNESDAY 13TH JUNE: biodiversity 12 – 12 midnight

12-1 Learn the Art of listening with PhD Arts Researcher Zoe Petersen. Zoe says:

This is an exploration of listening, based on the Deep Listening practice of composer Pauline Oliveros. I will take you through some simple exercises to help you tune into your own capacity to listen with greater attention and enjoyment.  

About Zoe’s research: In a context of late capitalism that is witnessing increasing disparity of human income and wealth and accelerating species extinction, Zoë Petersen’s research seeks in the idea of ‘the commons’ ways in which humans might live better, both with each other and with nonhumans. She takes a housing estate gardening group in South London as a small-scale context in which to address concerns that link up and down the scale from the soil microbes in vegetable beds to global climate change. The garden is proposed as a situation which can galvanise collective human action while, through its rich set of interactions between the human and nonhuman, it enhances the capacity of humans to perceive, recognize and value the action of nonhuman elements.

Throughout the day

Mulching – spades and mulch piles will be available for you to do your bit to help Fruit Routes by ensuring the bases of the trees are weed free and the trees are better at staying moist through the summer.

There will be space for conversations and creative activities which explore our place in the wider world: The world’s 7.6 billion people represent just 0.01% of all living things, according to the study. Yet since the dawn of civilisation, humanity has caused the loss of 83% of all wild mammals and half of plants Damien Carrington/The Guardian. In the UK  more than one in 10 of the UK’s wildlife species are threatened with extinction and the numbers of the nation’s most endangered creatures have plummeted by two-thirds since 1970, according to the State of Nature report from 2016.  The abundance of all wildlife has also fallen, with one in six animals, birds, fish and plants having been lost, the State of Nature report found.  Together with historical deforestation and industrialisation, these trends have left the UK “among the most nature-depleted countries in the world”

The Sustainability Team will share what the University is doing to preserve and protect biodiversity on campus and you can share your thoughts, concerns and ideas and about what more can be done.

We will be joined by Dr Gillian Whiteley, Lecturer in Fine Art who will lead a drop workshop on pamphlet making responding to the biodiversity theme. Artists’ have made use of the pamphlet for many decades as a form of communicating ideas and radical visions. Gillian will bring a range of historical pamphlets from her extensive research which show how influencial pamphlets have been in the past in communicating ideas.

Artists Anne-Marie Culhane & Paul Conneally have devised some activities to explore these themes more creatively. Some of these will build over the three days towards a closing ceremony on Friday.

THURSDAY 14TH JUNE: food systems 12 – 6

12-1 Summer Soup+Fruit Routes recipe book launch

1-2pm Food & foraging walk on Fruit Routes with Anne-Marie and PhD food systems researcher Jamie Stone.  Looking at what is growing to eat on campus as well as the impact of local sourcing in terms of production techniques, ethics, food miles, environmental sustainability and resilience to disruption.

3-4.30pm Open Discussion re Fruit Routes+Loughborough community: connections and opportunities. Fruit Routes has worked with a number of local groups and organisations in Loughborough including Transition Loughborough, Fearon Hall and Open Gardens. Looking to the future this is a change to explore links, connections and possibilities with the town of Loughborough including ideas such as extending Fruit Routes across the town and making use of waste fruit more widely.

Throughout the day

Mulching – spades and mulch piles will be available for you to do your bit to help Fruit Routes by ensuring the bases of the trees are weed free and the trees are better at staying moist through the summer.

There will be space for conversations and creative activities which explore the food system more widely.  95% of the fruit we eat is imported, and our food system contributed to 30% of greenhouse gas emissions. ‘The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat” Dr Jules Pretty.

Members of the Centre for SMART research team will be joining us to share their knowledge and research around the food system and supply chains.

The Sustainability Team will share what the University is doing to look at sustainable sourcing working with University catering and on the campus and you can share your thoughts, concerns and ideas and about what more can be done.

Artists Anne-Marie Culhane & Paul Conneally have devised some activities to explore these themes more creatively. Some of these will build over the three days towards a closing ceremony on Friday.

4.30-6pm

FRIDAY 15TH JUNE: climate change 12 -6

12-1pm Open Discussion on Climate Change individidual and institutional response-ability co-hosted with Dr. Tom Matthews, Climate Scientist.

3.30-5pm In Our Hands wild teas, scones and reading futures.

5.30pm Reflection and Closing Ceremony. Sharing silence and some of the ideas, comments and statetements made over the three days together.

Throughout the day

Mulching – spades and mulch piles will be available for you to do your bit to help Fruit Routes by ensuring the bases of the trees are weed free and the trees are better at staying moist through the summer.

There will be space for conversations and creative activities which explore climate change more widely.  Jo Dacombe, artist and a long term collaborator with Fruit Routes is sharing some of her research and conducting pseudo-scientific experiments during the day as part of ‘what we can’t see‘. Her work as part of the Imaginary Woodlands project is particularly focusing on pollen and what this can tell us about the details of our changing climate and the hidden worlds around (and in) us.

I thought the top environmental problems were biodiversity loss, ecosystem collapse and climate change. I thought with 30 years of good science we could address these problems, but I was wrong.
 The top environmental problems are selfishness, greed and apathy. To deal with them we need a spiritual and cultural transformation and we scientists do not know how to do this.


These are the words of Gus Speth, one of the first advisors on climate change to a US president, professor of Law and previously dean at Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. This year levels of Carbon Dioxide in the atmosphere topped 410 ppm which hasnt happened for millions of years. Climate Change is already impacting directly and indirectly on all our lives, how do we live, adapt, respond and act in this new climate?

The Sustainability Team will share what the University is doing to respond to climate change in terms of energy, transport, building and other aspects of the campus and you can share your thoughts, concerns and ideas and about what more can be done.

Artists Anne-Marie Culhane & Paul Conneally have devised some activities to explore these themes more creatively building over the three days towards a closing ceremony on Friday.

Drop in at any time for FREE food and drink. Open to ALL